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The ACC Men's Basketball Tournament (popularly known as the ACC Tournament) is the conference championship tournament in basketball for the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The tournament has been held every year since 1954, one year after the conference's creation. It is a single-elimination tournament and seeding is based on regular season records. The winner, declared conference champion, receives the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA men's basketball tournament.

History

Year Champion Score Runner-up Venue Tournament MVP
1954 NC State 82–80* Wake Forest Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Dickie Hemric
1955 NC State 87–77 Duke Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Ron Shavlik
1956 NC State 76–54 Wake Forest Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Vic Molodet
1957 North Carolina 95–75 South Carolina Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Lennie Rosenbluth
1958 Maryland 86–75 North Carolina Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Nick Davis
1959 NC State 80–56 North Carolina Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Lou Pucillo
1960 Duke 64–59 Wake Forest Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Doug Kistler
1961 Wake Forest 96–81 Duke Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Len Chappell
1962 Wake Forest 77–68 Clemson Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Len Chappell
1963 Duke 71–66 Wake Forest Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Art Heyman
1964 Duke 80–59 Wake Forest Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Jeff Mullins
1965 NC State 91–85 Duke Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Larry Worsley
1966 Duke 71–66 NC State Reynolds ColiseumRaleigh, NC Steve Vacendak
1967 North Carolina 82–73 Duke Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Larry Miller
1968 North Carolina 87–50 NC State Charlotte Coliseum^ • Charlotte, NC Larry Miller
1969 North Carolina 85–74 Duke Charlotte Coliseum^ • Charlotte, NC Charlie Scott
1970 NC State 42–39** South Carolina Charlotte Coliseum^ • Charlotte, NC Vann Williford
1971 South Carolina 52–51 North Carolina Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC John Roche
1972 North Carolina 73–64 Maryland Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Bob McAdoo
1973 NC State 76–74 Maryland Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Tommy Burleson
1974 NC State 103–100* Maryland Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Tommy Burleson
1975 North Carolina 70–66 NC State Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Phil Ford
1976 Virginia 67–62 North Carolina Capital CentreLandover, MD Wally Walker
1977 North Carolina 75–69 Virginia Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC John Kuester
1978 Duke 85–77 Wake Forest Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Jim Spanarkel
1979 North Carolina 71–63 Duke Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Dudley Bradley
1980 Duke 73–72 Maryland Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Albert King
1981 North Carolina 61–60 Maryland Capital CentreLandover, MD Sam Perkins
1982 North Carolina 47–45 Virginia Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC James Worthy
1983 NC State 81–78 Virginia The OmniAtlanta, GA Sidney Lowe
1984 Maryland 74–62 Duke Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Len Bias
1985 Georgia Tech 57–54 North Carolina The OmniAtlanta, GA Mark Price
1986 Duke 68–67 Georgia Tech Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Johnny Dawkins
1987 NC State 68–67 North Carolina Capital CentreLandover, MD Vinny Del Negro
1988 Duke 65–61 North Carolina Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Danny Ferry
1989 North Carolina 77–74 Duke The OmniAtlanta, GA J.R. Reid
1990 Georgia Tech 70–61 Virginia Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Brian Oliver
1991 North Carolina 96–74 Duke Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Rick Fox
1992 Duke 94–74 North Carolina Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Christian Laettner
1993 Georgia Tech 77–75 North Carolina Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC James Forrest
1994 North Carolina 73–66 Virginia Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Jerry Stackhouse
1995 Wake Forest 82–80* North Carolina Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Randolph Childress
1996 Wake Forest 75–74 Georgia Tech Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Tim Duncan
1997 North Carolina 64–54 NC State Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Shammond Williams
1998 North Carolina 83–68 Duke Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Antawn Jamison
1999 Duke 96–73 North Carolina Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Elton Brand
2000 Duke 81–68 Maryland Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Jason Williams
2001 Duke 79–53 North Carolina Georgia DomeAtlanta, GA Shane Battier
2002 Duke 91–61 NC State Charlotte ColiseumCharlotte, NC Carlos Boozer
2003 Duke 84–77 NC State Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Daniel Ewing
2004 Maryland 95–87* Duke Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC John Gilchrist
2005 Duke 69–64 Georgia Tech MCI CenterWashington, D.C. J. J. Redick
2006 Duke 78–76 Boston College Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC J. J. Redick
2007 North Carolina 89–80 NC State St. Pete Times ForumTampa, FL Brandan Wright
2008 North Carolina 86–81 Clemson Charlotte Bobcats ArenaCharlotte, NC Tyler Hansbrough
2009 Duke 79–69 Florida State Georgia DomeAtlanta, GA Jon Scheyer
2010 Duke 65–61 Georgia Tech Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC Kyle Singler
2011 Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC
2012 Philips ArenaAtlanta, GA
2013 Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC
2014 Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC
2015 Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC
2016 Greensboro ColiseumGreensboro, NC

^ The first "Charlotte Coliseum" used in the 1960s and 1970s is now known as Bojangles Coliseum.

* Overtime

** Double overtime

Venues

  • Capital Centre - Landover, Maryland (1976, 1981, 1987)
  • Charlotte Coliseum - Charlotte, North Carolina (1990–94, 1999–2000, 2002)
  • Cricket Arena - Charlotte, North Carolina (1968–70)
  • Georgia Dome - Atlanta, Georgia (2001, 2009)
  • Greensboro Coliseum - Greensboro, North Carolina (1967, 1971–75, 1977–80, 1982, 1986, 1988, 1995–98, 2003–04, 2006, 2010–11, 2013–16)
  • Omni Coliseum - Atlanta, Georgia (1983, 1985, 1989)
  • Philips Arena - Atlanta, Georgia (2012)
  • Reynolds Coliseum - Raleigh, North Carolina (1954–66)
  • St. Pete Times Forum - Tampa, Florida (2007)
  • Time Warner Cable Arena - Charlotte, North Carolina (2008)
  • Verizon Center - Washington D.C. (2005)

Tournament championships by school

School (year joined)[1] Winners Years
Duke University (1953) 18 1960, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1978, 1980, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010
University of North Carolina (1953) 17 1957, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1972, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1989, 1991, 1994, 1997, 1998, 2007, 2008
N. C. State University (1953) 10 1954, 1955, 1956, 1959, 1965, 1970, 1973[a], 1974, 1983, 1987
Wake Forest University (1953) 4 1961, 1962, 1995, 1996
Georgia Tech (1978) 3 1985, 1990, 1993
University of Maryland (1953) 3 1958, 1984, 2004
University of South Carolina (1953)[b] 1 1971
University of Virginia (1953) 1 1976
Boston College (2005) 0
Clemson University (1953) 0
Florida State University (1991) 0
University of Miami (2004) 0
Virginia Tech (2004) 0

Footnotes

  • a The 1972–73 NC State Wolfpack team was forced to skip postseason play due to an NCAA recruiting infraction.[2] Assistant coach Eddie Biedenbach had played in a pick-up (impromptu) basketball game with David Thompson on a recruiting visit to Raleigh, North Carolina.[2] The Wolfpack finished the season undefeated at 27–0 but were never given the opportunity to compete for the national championship.[2]
  • b The University of South Carolina left the Atlantic Coast Conference in 1971, and it is now a member of the Southeastern Conference.[1][3]

References

General
Specific
  1. 1.0 1.1 2009–10 Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Media Guide 2009, p. 82
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Crawford, Jacob (December 26, 2003). "Complete History of NC State Basketball". NorthCarolinaState.scout.com. http://northcarolinastate.scout.com/2/209048.html. Retrieved March 10, 2010. 
  3. "SEC Men's Basketball". secsports.com. Southeastern Conference. 2010. http://www.secsports.com/sports/mbball/default.aspx. Retrieved May 31, 2010. 

Sources

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