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Syracuse Orange
SyracuseOrange
School Name: Syracuse University
Location: Syracuse, New York
Arena: Carrier Dome
Capacity: 33,000
Conference: Big East
Head coach: Jim Boeheim

The Syracuse Orange men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball program of Syracuse University. The program is classified in the NCAA's Division I, and the team competes in the Big East Conference.

Syracuse Basketball History

Syracuse first fielded a basketball team in 1899 and enjoyed early success, being recognized as national champions in 1918 and 1926. The 1926 squad was coached by legendary coach Lew Andreas and featured Basketball Hall of Famer Vic Hanson

The school made National Invitation Tournament ("NIT") appearances in 1946 and 1950 and made its first NCAA Basketball Tournament appearance in 1957.

The modern era of Syracuse basketball began with the arrival of future Hall of Famer Dave Bing. As a sophomore in 1964, Bing led the team to an NIT appearance and as a senior in 1966, he led the team to its second NCAA Tournament appearance, where it reached the regional final. Bing's backcourt partner on these teams was future Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim.

Syracuse remained competitive after Bing's departure, with NIT appearances in 1967, 1971 and 1972. Under coach Roy Danforth, in 1973, the team began a string of consecutive NCAA appearances highlighted by a Final Four appearance in 1975. The 1975 squad featured guards Jim Lee and Rudy Hackett and was affectionately known as "Roy's Runts."

Following the 1976 season, Danforth was hired away by Tulane University and the University turned to young assistant Jim Boeheim to assume the helm. Boeheim extended the string of NCAA appearances to nine, with bids in each of his first four seasons, a period in which his teams won 100 games. These teams featured star forward Louis Orr and center Roosevelt Bouie and were sometimes referred to as the "Louie and Bouie Show."

Syracuse was a founding member of the Big East Conference in 1979, along with Georgetown, St. John's and Providence. Syracuse and Georgetown were each ranked in the top ten in 1980, and a new and major rivalry blossomed when Georgetown snapped the Orangemen's 57 game home winning streak in the final men's basketball game played at Manley Field House. Over the next ten seasons, these two schools met eight times in the Big East Tournament, four times in the finals, and met numerous times on national television during the regular season.

Syracuse won the Big East Tournament in 1981, but was passed over by the NCAA Tournament. The team, featuring Danny Schayes and Leo Rautins, finished runner-up in the NIT. The team returned to the NIT in 1982, before beginning another extended streak of NCAA appearances in 1983.

Buoyed by the visibility provided by the Big East and by rising attendances at the Carrier Dome, the Orangemen continued to increase in national prominence. Heralded high school phenomenon Dwayne "Pearl" Washington joined the Orangemen in 1983, and led the school to NCAA appearances in 1984, 1985, and 1986, before leaving school early for the NBA Draft.

Despite the early loss of Washington, Syracuse returned to the NCAA's in 1987, with a team featuring Rony Seikaly, Sherman Douglas and freshman Derrick Coleman, reaching the Final Four before losing, 73-74, in the final to Indiana on a last-second jump shot by Keith Smart. Led by Coleman, Douglas, Seikaly, Stephen Thompson and Billy Owens, the school extended its string of NCAA appearances to 10 seasons before that string was broken in 1993, due to NCAA sanctions resulting from an incident involving a booster.

Led by guard Lawrence Moten and forward/center John Wallace, the school returned to the NCAA's in 1994 and 1995. In 1996, Wallace led the team to its third Final Four appearance, where it played impressively before losing, 67-76, in the final to a heavily-favored Kentucky team that included nine future NBA players. (Kentucky head coach Rick Pitino had been an assistant coach to Boeheim in 1976, 1977.)

The 1997 squad won 19 games but was bypassed by the NCAA Tournament and appeared in the NIT. The 1998, 1999 and 2000 squads featuring guard Jason Hart and center Etan Thomas all earned NCAA bids. In 2000, the University also named its All-Century Team, recognizing its greatest players of the 20th century and the school's first 100 years of basketball. The team made a fourth consecutive NCAA appearance in 2001, but returned to the NIT in 2002, despite a having a 20-win season.

Although unranked in the preseason polls for the 2002-03 season, led by freshmen Carmelo Anthony and Gerry McNamara and sophomore Hakim Warrick, the Orangemen won their first NCAA Tournament Championship with a 81-78 defeat of Kansas in the final. Anthony was named NCAA Basketball Tournament Most Outstanding Player. Anthony left for the NBA Draft after the school year, but McNamara and Warrick stayed on, leading the team to NCAA bids in 2004 and 2005. In 2006, McNamara would lead the Orangemen to an extremely unexpected Big East Championship victory, making the 9th-seeded Orangemen the lowest seed to ever win the championship and only the 3rd school to repeat as Big East tournament champions, but was immediately defeated in the opening round of the tournament by Texas A&M, 66-58.

The 2007-08 season for the Orange was up and down. The Orange had a 50 point win over East Tennessee State on December 15, the largest margin of victory in 20 seasons. They recorded top-25 wins over Georgetown and Marquette . But the team lost to Villanova in the Big East Tournament opening round, and to UMass in the NIT. UMass became the first team ever to beat the Orange twice in the same season at the Carrier Dome.

To date, the Syracuse men's basketball program has made 31 NCAA Tournament appearances, including 4 Final Four appearances and one NCAA Tournament Championship. The program has also made 11 NIT appearances and won 2 early (pre-tournament era) national championships. The program has produced 2 Hall of Fame players, Vic Hanson and Dave Bing, and one Hall of Fame coach, Jim Boeheim.

The Orange have experienced a tremendous home court advantage over the years. Prior to this year only one team had ever beaten Syracuse at home more than once in a season. Penn State beat the Orange twice in Syracuse in the 1922-1923 season. The feat went unmatched until this year when the University of Massachusetts defeated the Orange in the Carrier Dome by scores of 107-100 and 81-77.

Season-by-season results

Season Overall
Wins
Overall
Losses
Pct. Conf.
Wins
Conf.
Losses
Pct. Conference
Finish
Conference
Tournament
Postseason Head Coach Team
Accomplishment
1900-01 22.500 -- -- -- -- --NoneNo Coach
1901-02 33.500 -- -- -- -- --NoneNo Coach
1902-03 18.111 -- -- -- -- --NoneNo Coach
1903-04 118.579 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1904-05 147.667 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1905-06 93.750 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1906-07 43.571 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1907-08 103.769 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1908-09 78.467 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1909-10 311.214 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1910-11 611.353 -- -- -- -- --NoneJohn A. R. Scott
1911-12 113.786 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1912-13 83.727 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1913-14 1201.000 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1914-15 101.909 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1915-16 93.750 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1916-17 133.813 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1917-18 161.941 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund DollardNational Champions
1918-19 133.813 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1919-20 153.833 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1920-21 129.571 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1921-22 168.941 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1922-23 812.400 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1923-24 810.444 -- -- -- -- --NoneEdmund Dollard
1924-25 152.882 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1925-26 191.950 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis AndreasNational Champions
1926-27 154.789 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1927-28 106.625 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1928-29 114.733 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1929-30 182.900 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1930-31 164.800 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1931-32 138.619 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1932-33 142.875 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1933-34 152.882 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1934-35 152.882 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1935-36 125.706 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1936-37 134.765 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1937-38 145.737 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1938-39 154.789 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1939-40 108.556 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1940-41 145.737 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1941-42 156.714 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1942-43 810.444 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1943-44 Did not play - Team suspended
1944-45 712.368 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1945-46 234.852 -- -- -- -- --NITLewis Andreas
1946-47 196.760 -- -- -- -- --NCAA District IILewis Andreas
1947-48 1113.458 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1948-49 187.720 -- -- -- -- --NoneLewis Andreas
1949-50 189.667 -- -- -- -- --NITLewis Andreas
1950-51 199.679 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1951-52 146.700 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1952-53 711.389 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1953-54 109.526 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1954-55 1011.476 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1955-56 148.636 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1956-57 187.720 -- -- -- -- --1957 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentMarc Guley
1957-58 1110.524 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1958-59 149.609 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1959-60 138.619 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1960-61 419.174 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1961-62 222.083 -- -- -- -- --NoneMarc Guley
1962-63 813.381 -- -- -- -- --NoneFred Lewis
1963-64 178.680 -- -- -- -- --NITFred Lewis
1964-65 1310.565 -- -- -- -- --NoneFred Lewis
1965-66 226.786 -- -- -- -- --1966 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentFred Lewis
1966-67 206.769 -- -- -- -- --NITFred Lewis
1967-68 1114.440 -- -- -- -- --NoneFred Lewis
1968-69 916.360 -- -- -- -- --NoneRoy Danforth
1969-70 1212.500 -- -- -- -- --NoneRoy Danforth
1970-71 197.731 -- -- -- -- --NITRoy Danforth
1971-72 226.786 -- -- -- -- --NITRoy Danforth
1972-73 245.828 -- -- -- -- --1973 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentRoy Danforth
1973-74 197.731 -- -- -- -- --1974 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentRoy Danforth
1974-75 239.719 -- -- -- -- --1975 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentRoy Danforth
1975-76 209.690 -- -- -- -- --1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentRoy Danforth
1976-77 264.867 -- -- -- -- --1977 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentJim Boeheim
1977-78 226.786 -- -- -- -- --1978 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentJim Boeheim
1978-79 264.867 -- -- -- -- --1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentJim Boeheim
1979-80 264.86751.833T-1st (Big East)Lost in finals1980 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball TournamentJim Boeheim
1980-81 2212.64768.4296thConference ChampionsNITJim Boeheim
1981-82 1613.55277.5005thLost in quarter-finalsNITJim Boeheim
1982-83 2110.67797.5635thLost in semi-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1983-84 239.719124.7502ndLost in finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1984-85 229.71097.5633rdLost in semi-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1985-86 266.813142.8751stLost in finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1986-87 317.816124.7501stLost in finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1987-88 269.743115.6882ndConference ChampionNCAAJim Boeheim
1988-89 308.789106.6253rdLost in finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1989-90 267.788124.7501stLost in finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1990-91 266.813124.7501stLost in quarter-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1991-92 2210.688108.5565thConference ChampionNCAAJim Boeheim
1992-93 209.690108.5563rdLost in finalsNoneJim Boeheim
1993-94 237.767135.7222ndLost in quarter-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1994-95 2010.667126.6673rdLost in quarter-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1995-96 299.763126.6672nd (Big East 7)Lost in semi-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1996-97 1913.59499.5004th (Big East 7)Lost in quarter-finalsNITJim Boeheim
1997-98 269.743126.6671st (Big East 7)Lost in finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1998-99 2112.636108.5564thLost in semi-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
1999-00 266.813133.8131stLost in quarter-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
2000-01 259.813106.625T-2nd (West)Lost in semi-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
2001-02 2313.63997.563T-3rd (West)Lost in 1st RoundNITJim Boeheim
2002-03 305.857116.647T-1st (West)Lost in semi-finalsNCAAJim BoeheimNational Champions
2003-04 238.742133.813T-3rd (West)Lost in quarter-finalsNCAAJim Boeheim
2004-05 277.794116.647T-3rd (West)Conference ChampionNCAAJim Boeheim
2005-06 2312.65779.438T-9thConference ChampionNCAAJim Boeheim
2006-07 2411.686106.625T-5thLost in quarter-finalsNITJim Boeheim
2007-08 1912.68299.5569thLost in quarter-finalsNITJim Boeheim
108
Seasons
1723794.685300170.6387 Big East titles
(Regular season)
5 Big East
tournament titles
31 NCAA bids (t-7th)
11 NIT bids
4 Final Fours3 National
Championships
Syracuse Orangemen roster 13-14
1 Michael Carter-Williams G 6-6 185 SO Hamilton, MA
3 Jerami Grant F 6-8 203 FR Hyattsville, MD
4 Nolan Hart G 5-10 152 JR Albany, NY
5 C.J. Fair F 6-8 215 JR Baltimore, MD
10 Trevor Cooney G 6-4 195 FR Wilmington, DE
12 Baye Keita C 6-10 215 JR Saint Louis, Senegal
13 Griffin Hoffmann G 6-1 178 SR New York, NY
14 Matt Lyde-Cajuste F 6-5 215 SR Mount Vernon, NY
20 Brandon Triche G 6-4 210 SR Jamesville, NY
21 Noel Jones F 6-6 230 JR Halifax, NS
23 Russ DeRemer G 6-5 203 JR Wrentham, MA
25 Rakeem Christmas F 6-9 242 SO Philadelphia, PA
32 DaJuan Coleman F 6-9 288 FR Jamesville, NY
33 Albert Nassar F 6-6 195 SO Stuart, FL
43 James Southerland F 6-8 215 SR Bayside, NY

Basketball retired uniforms

Like many sports teams, Syracuse University retires jersey/uniform numbers as a way to honor its athletes. Historically, Syracuse University has restricted the men's basketball team from wearing retired numbers. A perfect example is Carmelo Anthony, who wore #22 in high school. However, since the number was already retired at Syracuse, Anthony chose #15 as an alternate upon his arrival. Similarly, Gerry McNamara wore #31 in high school, also retired by Syracuse University (McNamara chose #3 instead).

Notable Players

External links

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